Webinar hosted by UQ School of Languages and Cultures in collaboration with Language Technology and Data Analysis Laboratory (LADAL)

Speaker: 

Professor Felicity Meakins, Linguistics Discipline, ARC Future Fellow, School of Languages and Cultures, UQ

Felicity Meakins is an ARC Future Fellow in Linguistics at the University of Queensland and a CI in the ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language. She is a field linguist who specialises in the documentation of Australian Indigenous languages in the Victoria River District of the Northern Territory and the effect of English on Indigenous languages. She has worked as a community linguist as well as an academic over the past 20 years, facilitating language revitalisation programs, consulting on Native Title claims and conducting research into Indigenous languages. She has compiled a number of dictionaries and grammars of traditional Indigenous languages and has written numerous papers on language change in Australia.

Title:

Field-based methods for collecting quantitative data

Abstract:

Shana Poplack has set benchmarks for the development of corpora since the early 1980s. Poplack (2015, p. 921) maintains that the “gold standard remains the (standard sociolinguistic-style) … corpus”. The aim of producing corpora using these principles is to avoid the ‘cherry picking’ approach which dominates much of the theoretical literature. Poplack and her team have created the Ottawa-Hull Corpus which consists of 3.5 million words of informal speech data. This corpus is enormous and beyond the capabilities of a single linguist in a small language community. This talk offers suggestions for corpus development in the field that follow Poplack’s principles, but also shows where compromises can be made. I discuss the method developed during the Gurindji Kriol project called ‘peer elicitation’. It supplements Poplack’s gold standard of naturally occurring speech with semi-formal elicitation to ensure sufficient data for quantitative analyses.

About The Language Technology and Data Analysis Laboratory (LADAL) Webinars 2021

The Language Technology and Data Analysis Laboratory (LADAL) is school-based support infrastructure for computational humanities research established and maintained by the UQ School of Languages and Cultures. The LADAL is part of the ARDC Australian Text Analytics Platform (ATAP) which represents a nation-wide attempt to foster computational skills in HASS. It collaborates with and shares expertise with several Australian and international centres, institutions, researchers, and experts.

The LADAL consists of a specialist computing lab for language-based computational and experimental work (the Computational and Experimental Workshop) and an online virtual lab (the LADAL website). The LADAL website offers self-guided study materials and hands-on tutorials on topics relating to digital tools, computational methods for data extraction and processing, data visualization, statistical analyses of language data, and provides links to further resources and short descriptions of digital tools relevant for digital HASS research. In addition, the LADAL offers face-to-face consultations and specialized workshops. SLC researchers are encouraged to contact LADAL staff for advice and guidance on matters relating to digital research tools, data visualization, various statistical procedures, and text analytics.  As such, the LADAL offers pathways to new research possibilities in HASS with a focus on computational quantitative text analytics.

 

Venue

Zoom link https://uqz.zoom.us/j/638 873 5320
Room: 
Online