Synopsis:

A Japanese soldier and an American soldier find themselves together in a cave on a small remote island south of Okinawa as the biggest land battle in Asian history rages up north. It is the first week of April 1945 and the Americans are attacking Okinawa. Though the two soldiers do not speak each other’s language, it is clear that they have vowed never to harm each other. They are joined by a 16-year-old bilingual girl who spent her early childhood years in Los Angeles. All goes well until the Japanese soldier’s brother appears. He has been wounded in battle but claims that, once recovered, he will kill the three traitors in the cave. Some days later there is a violent scene, and three of the four are dead … but we do not know which one has survived.

The story is taken up again in 2016, when a Japanese university student uncovers an amazing truth about the incidents in the cave in 1945. Who really survived, and what significance it has for people caught up in war … these are the themes of this dramatic historical thriller.

The film is in Japanese with English subtitles.

Website in Japanese and English: star-sand.com

Director

Roger Pulvers, acclaimed author, playwright, theatre and film director, translator and journalist, has published more than fifty books in Japanese and English, including novels such as The Death of Urashima Taro, General Yamashita’s Treasure, Star Sand, Liv and The Dream of Lafcadio Hearn. In March he published his autobiography, The Unmaking of an American. In 2017 the feature film of Star Sand, written and directed by him, had wide release throughout Japan. 
Roger has worked extensively in film and television. He was assistant to director Nagisa Oshima on the film Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence, starring David Bowie, Tom Conti and Ryuichi Sakamoto. He also co-wrote the script for the Japanese film Ashita e no Yuigon (Best Wishes for Tomorrow), for which he won the Crystal Simorgh Prize for Best Script at the 27th Fajr International Film Festival in Tehran. 

Roger received the prestigious Miyazawa Kenji Prize in 2008 and the Noma Award for the Translation of Japanese Literature in 2013; in 2018, Japan’s highest honour, the Order of the Rising Sun; and in 2019, the Order of Australia. Over the past fifty years he has translated prose, drama and poetry from Japanese, Russian and Polish. His plays have been widely performed in Australia, Japan and the United States.

The screening will commence at 6pm, followed by a Q&A session with director Roger Pulvers.

This is a free event however please register to secure your seat. 

Venue

Steele Building #3, University of Queensland, St Lucia Campus
Room: 
206